Letting go.

Andre Nelson
7 min readNov 5, 2021

“Live and let go. Do not be held down by what you cannot control.” – Unknown

I’ve had this article sat in drafts for almost a year now, and I haven’t been able to finish writing it, or anything else outside of what was strictly necessary for work, for that matter.

“Once upon a time, a great and majestic eagle lived high upon a mountain top. From her nest, she could survey the surroundings for miles around. One morning, it spied a huge rat scavenging around at the base of the mountain. Hungry, the eagle swooped down from her perch and snatched up the rat in her sharp talons. The rat struggled and squirmed in her grip, obviously not wanting to be eaten. In desperation, the rat began to gnaw away at the eagle’s claws in a bid to free himself. In pain but unwilling to let her meal escape, the eagle drew her claws in closer to her body and tightened her grip, crushing the rat as it wriggled and writhed. As she flew higher, the rat continued to bite and gnaw, while she in response continued to squeeze the rat harder. the eagle failed to take note that the rat was gnawing into her body as she drew him in closer to her. Eventually, the rat stopped its struggle – the eagle had managed to crush the life out of the rat. Exhausted from the battle, the eagle sped back up to her nest with her hard-won prize. As she landed, the eagle collapsed and died from the mortal wound that the rat had inflicted upon her body – the dead rat still in the now-deceased eagle’s death grip.”

I learned two major takeaways from this fable. First, what may seem appealing – especially from a distance – can often be harmful, even toxic to us. Secondly, and perhaps most importantly, failing to let go of things that are eating away at us – whether we realise it or not – will eventually do us significant harm. I first heard this cautionary tale many years ago from an amazingly smart and talented lady and her husband whom I hold in the highest regard, during a house church meeting. The lessons it taught me stayed with me for a long time but unfortunately, I lost sight of the message in recent years as work commitments and life challenges have piled up.

As Business Analysts and as people in general, we often become attached to the work and projects we are involved in. This is natural and entirely understandable, given that we commit many hours towards ensuring the…

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Andre Nelson

UK-based Consultant & Business Analyst. Believer. Dad. Oft-frustrated lover of Arsenal FC. Helping the world to better understand Business Analysis.